Loders Church Roll of Honour 1914-1918

Albert John Travers A. Travers 22 September 1914

Albert John Travers was born in 1893. His parents were John and Annie Travers. In the 1901 census Albert J Travers age 7 is shown living in Uploders with his father John C Travers aged 35, a net braider, and his brother Arthur J Travers age 9. In the 1911 census Albert Travers is aged 17, a farm labourer and living with his uncle Oscar and aunt Sarah Travers.

Military

Albert John Travers joined the Royal Navy and was a Stoker 1st Class. His service number was K/14738. He was killed in action on 22 September 1914 age 21. At the time of his death he was serving on board HMS Aboukir. His body was not recovered for burial. His Aunt Sarah of Uploders was notified of his death. His name is recorded in the Portsmouth Naval Memorial.

HMS Aboukir

HMS AboukirOn 22 September 1914 Arthur Travers was on board HMS Aboukir an old cruiser with four funnels. HMS Aboukir, Cressy and Hogue were patrolling the North Sea and were usually accompanied by destroyers for protection. A storm forced the destroyers into port leaving the ‘Live Bait Squadron’ as they were known, unprotected. HMS Aboukir, Cressy and Hogue were all sunk by the U- 9 a single German U- boat. 1459 men were killed and 837 survived.

F. Travers 26 November 1914

Frederick Hubert Reginald Travers was born in 1889 and baptised at Loders Church on 27 October 1889. He was the son of Ernest Edgar Travers and Mary Anne Elizabeth Travers. His father was a labourer.

The 1891 census shows Frederick H R Travers aged 1 living in Loders with his family. They were his parents Ernest (26) and Elizabeth Mary (24) and his sisters Lillian Emily (4) Annie G E (3) and Bessie A F.

The 1901 census shows Frederick aged 11 living with his parents Ernest (37) and Mary (36) and Annie (13), Bessie (10) Richard (3) and Willoughby (2) in Uploders. His father is recorded as being an agricultural labourer.

Military

Frederick Travers joined the Royal Navy and was a Leading Stoker no. K/6012 on board HMS Bulwark. He died on 22 November 1914 at the age of 25 in a tragic accident. His sister Myrtle of 132 North Allington was notified of his death. His body was not recovered for burial. His name is recorded on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial.

HMS BulwarkHMS Bulwark

On 26 November 1914 HMS Bulwark, a 15,000 ton battleship was moored at buoy number 17 at Kethole Reach on the River Medway. She was taking on coal from the airship base at Kingsnorth, on the Isle of Grain. At 7.50 am, as the crew were having breakfast, an explosion ripped the ship apart. The explosion killed 745 men and 51 officers. There are mass graves and individual graves in Woodlands Cemetery in Gillingham for the dead.

W. Russell 8 May 1915

Wilfred Gordon Russell was baptised in Loders Church on 11 May 1893. He was the son of Eli and Mary Ann nee Samways. Eli Russell was a butcher. In the 1901 census Wilfred Russell is recorded as being age 8 and living with his parents and 2 sisters at the Butchers Shop in Loders. In the 1911 census Wilfred Russell is aged 18 and living at 38 Loders, he was single and working as a butcher. He was living with his parents Eli, (62) Mary Ann (48), and sisters Hilda Maud (20) and Dorothy Anna (14).

Military

Wilfred Gordon Russell enlisted in the army in Pinner, Middlesex. He was a Private in the East Surrey Regiment 2nd Battalion service no. 3341. He was killed in action on 8 May 1915 in France and Flanders. His burial place is recorded as at Ypres (Ieper) West Flanders, (West-Vlaanderen), Belgium and there is also a memorial to him in Loders Churchyard. [8 May 1915 was during the second Battle of Ypres. On that date it is recorded that the British lost Frezenberg Ridge under terrific shelling.]

W. L. Fry 29 May 1915

Walter ‘Louis’ Fry was baptised on 7 March 1897 in Litton Cheney. His father was George Fry and his mother was Annie Charlotte Fry. The 1901 census shows him aged 4 and living with his parents in Long Bredy. His father was aged 33, his mother 25 and his brother Horace was 1. The 1911 census shows Walter Louis Fry aged 14 and attending school. He was living at Uploders Farm with his parents George (42)(farmer) and Annie Charlotte (36) and brothers and sisters Horace Roland (11) Dorothy Irene (8) Frederick George (2) and Douglas Oliver (10m).

Louis emigrated to Canada to join his father when he was aged 16. He travelled on the Cunard ship ‘Ascania’. He arrived in Quebec on 19 May 1913. He was travelling on to Ontario to work as a dairy farmer and lived at Lonne Butt. Soon after arrival he enlisted in the Canadian Infantry as a Private in (Western Ontario Regiment) 1st battalion, Service Number 6682 and he returned to England prior to embarking for the front. He died of a wound at the No.1 Casualty Clearing Station on 29 May 1915 aged 18 and was buried the same day. A cross was erected and his grave reference is I.C.82 in the Chocques Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais.

W. S. Brown 21 August 1915

Walter ‘Stanley’ Brown was born in 1888 and baptised in Loders Church on 10 April 1888. His father was William and his mother Julia. He is recorded in the 1891 census as aged 3 and living in Loders with his parents William (27) Julia (35) and sisters Florence Adala (6) and Jesse (1) (girl).Thomas Norman (82) was a visitor. In the 1901 census he is recorded as aged 13 and living at Uploders with his parents and 3 sisters. In 1911 he is aged 23 and a single man, living in Uploders and working as a blacksmith. He is living with his parents William (62) Julia (54) and Ellen Patten (56), a relative. His father was working as a builder and wheelwright.

Military

Stanley Brown was a Private in the Dorsetshire Regiment 5th Battalion service no.10891. He was killed in action at Gallipoli. He was buried in Gallipoli, Canakkale, Turkey. He also has a memorial in Loders Churchyard. Stanley Brown enlisted between 1-8 September 1914. His occupation was given as a blacksmith. He left Liverpool on 2 July 1915 on the liner ‘Aquitaine’ for the Dardanelles, arriving in Limnos on 11 July 1915; moved to Imbres 19 July; landed Suvla Bay ‘A’ beach on 6 August. At 3pm on 21 August the battalion took part in an attack on Hetman Chair to capture Turkish positions and this involved a 500 yard advance over open ground under very heavy fire. The first line of trenches was taken, the Turks retiring to a support line. The second line was attacked, but heavy fire from the left flank forced a withdrawal to the captured first line. Losses on the 21st amounted to over 300 killed, wounded or missing out of around 550 who took part. Stanley Brown was one of the men who sacrificed his life on that day.

Battle for Gallipoli February 1915-January 1916

Aiming to secure a sea route to Russia, the British and French launched a naval campaign to force a passage through the Dardanelles. After the naval campaign, an amphibious landing was undertaken on the Gallipoli peninsula, to capture the Ottoman capital of Constantinople (Istanbul). After eight months the land campaign also failed with many casualties on both sides, and the invasion force was withdrawn to Egypt. The Battle of Scimitar Hill which ran alongside the Battle of Hill 60 on 21 August 1915 comprised a last ditch effort by the Allied force under Mediterranean Commander-in-Chief Sir Ian Hamilton to break north from Anzac Cove and N and E of Sulvia Bay thus linking the 5 km distance between the two sectors.

In the wake of the failure of the Allied attacks at Scimitar Hill and Hill 60 the evacuation beginning 21 August 2015 intended to link the two Allied sectors of Anzac Cove and Sulvia Bay, Mediterranean Commander Sir Ian Hamilton telegraphed London in a state of increasing despondency. He requested a further 95,000 reinforcements from Lord Kitchener. He was offered 25,000.

Hamilton received word on 11 October 1915 of the proposed evacuation. He estimated casualties would run at up to 50%. He was replaced by Sir Charles Munro who recommended evacuation. Lord Kitchener did not agree but then visited and changed his mind and recommended evacuation on 15 November 1915. The government sanctioned evacuation on 7 December 1915. Evacuation continued until 9 January 1916.

480,000 Allied troops had participated in the Gallipoli campaign. There were 252,000 casualties –of these 48,000 were fatalities. Following the evacuation the Allies continued to block Mediterranean access to the Dardanelles Straits until Turkey’s collapse and exit from the war in October 1918.

T. Taylor 12 October 1915

Thomas Charles Taylor enlisted on 12 December 1914 aged 30, and was at that time recorded to be married with one child and working as a gardener. He was a Private in the Dorsetshire Regiment 5th battalion no. 12615. He left Liverpool on 2 July 1915 on the liner ‘Aquitaine’ for the Dardanelles arriving in Limnos on 11 July 1915; moved to Imbres 19 July; landed Suvla Bay ‘A’ beach on 6 August. At 3pm on 21 August the battalion took part in an attack on Hetman Chair to capture Turkish positions and this involved a 500 yard advance over open ground under very heavy fire. The first line of trenches were taken, the Turks retiring to a support line. The second line was attacked, but heavy fire from the left flank forced a withdrawal to the captured first line. Losses on the 21st amounted to over 300 killed, wounded or missing out of around 550 who took part. Thomas Taylor was wounded on 22nd August 1915. He was evacuated to Mudros and died at the 35th Canadian Stationery Hospital in October. His grave reference is V.B.110 Portianos Military Cemetery. This is on the Greek island of Limnos between Greece and Turkey not far from the Gallipoli/Cannakkale area.

W. J. Lee 31 May 1916

William John Lee was born on 21 February1875 in Eype. His parents were Thomas Eveleigh Lee and Sarah Ann nee Warren. In the 1881 census William Lee was aged 6 and living at 35 St Michael’s Lane, Bridport, with his parents Thomas Lee (52) and Sarah Ann Lee (41) and sisters Mary (16), Sarah (10), and brothers William (6), Henry (3) and Earnest (1). The 1891 census records William Lee living with his parents and Sarah, Henry and Ernest.

Marriage

William John Lee (21) flaxdresser, married Emily Ann White (23) on 21 April 1894 at Loders Church. His father Thomas Eveleigh Lee was recorded as a shipwright. By 1901 William Lee (27) and his wife Emily A (29) were living in Portsmouth with children William (6), Agnes (4), and Phyllis (1).

Military

William John Lee, joined the Royal Navy and was a Leading Stoker service no. 286431. He was killed as a direct result of enemy action on 31 May 1916 on HMS Queen Mary. He was 43. His widow Emily Ann of Lower Loders was notified. His body was not recovered for burial.
His name is recorded at Ref. 16 Portsmouth Naval Memorial.

Battle of Jutland 31 May – 1 June 1916

The HMS Queen Mary was a battle cruiser of the Lion Class built in 1912 with a propulsion steam speed of 27.5 knots. She was lost in battle on 31 May 1916. At 16.25 HMS Queen Mary exploded and went down in only 90 seconds after probably receiving a hit from the German Battle Cruiser Von der Tarm. There were casualties of 1266 plus ranks 62. The wreck site is NW of Denmark. Two destroyers on both sides were also sunk during this period. The Battle of Jutland was the biggest naval battle in history – without a clear victor. Total warships lost at the Battle of Jutland – Royal Navy 14, High Seas Fleet 11.

A. Clarke 15 July 1916

Arthur John Clark was born on 20 September 1879 and baptised at Loders Church on 26 Oct 1879. He was the son of Job and Emilia Clark. His father was a packer. He was married when he was aged 24 in the parish of Allington to Elizabeth Jane Gale, also aged 24. Arthur was recorded as working as a factory hand and his father Job (deceased) had been a plate layer. Elizabeth’s father Bernard Gale was a twine maker. One of the witnesses to the marriage was Frederick Clarke. The 1911 census records Arthur Clark as aged 31 and his occupation was as a heckler, a rope and twine worker. He was living with his wife Elizabeth (31) and children Mabel (6), Albert Edward (5) and Florence (3).

Military

Arthur John Clark was 34 when he enlisted on 1 September 1914. The enlistment record shows that he was married with three children and was working as a flax and hemp dresser. His enlistment record was countersigned by J.A. Colfox. He served as a Private in the Dorset Regiment 6th battalion service no. 10628. Arthur John Clark died of wounds on 16 July 1916 in France and Flanders. He was 36. He is buried in the cemetery of St Sever, Rouen, the First Part A to L. Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France. [1 July 1916 was the start of the Battle of the Somme with the greatest number of casualties in British military history – 60,000.]

A. E. Samways 5 October 1916

Alfred ‘Edgar’ Samways was born on 18 September 1892 and baptised on 16 October 1892 at Loders Church. He was the son of Alfred (born in Loders) and Mary (born in Hinton St George) who had married on 28 October 1890 in Loders. (There was also an Alfred Edward Samways baptised the same year at Loders Church.)

In the 1901 census Edgar was aged 8 and was living with his parents Alfred (35) and Mary (33) and sisters Beatrice (10), Elsie (5), Ada (3) and brother Levi (3m) in Uploders.

In the 1911 census Edgar was 18 and living in Uploders. He was single and working as a grocer. He was living with his parents Alfred (45) and Mary (43) and sisters Elsie (15), Ada (13) and brothers Levi (10), Herbert (6), Frederick (2) and Sidney (6m).

Military

Alfred Edgar Samways was a Private no. 151909 in the 43rd Canadian battalion of the British Expeditionary Force. Infantry. When he enlisted on 11 November 1915 in the Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force, he was living in Wawenesa, Manitoba and was single and a farmer. He was killed in action on 5 October 1916 in the trenches north of Courcelette.
His name in recorded on the Vimy memorial in France. His grave is in the Departement due Pas de Calais, Nord Pas de Calais, France. Probate was granted to Mary Samways (his mother) on 19 September 1917 in relation to Alfred Edgar Samways (d. 5 October 1916) then said to be of Symondsbury.

F. Hyde 1 October 1917

Frederick William Hyde was born on 30 October 1882 and baptised at Loders Church on 31 December 1882. His father was Frederick and his mother was Phillis. At the time of the 1891 census Frederick was living in Loders with his parents Frederick (40) Phillis (41) and sister Emma E (5) and Mary Muti (?)(42). In the 1901 census Frederick Hyde was aged 18 and living with his parents and sister and working as an errand boy.

In the 1911 census Fred Hyde was aged 27 and living at 41 Loders, he was a jobbing printer living with his sister Emma (25) and brother-in-law Dan Travers (35) their daughter Ivy (1) and Phillis Hyde (61) (Fred’s mother)

Military

Frederick William Hyde served as a Private in the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry Battalion 1/1st Bucks Battalion. He was killed in action on 2 October 1917 in France and Flanders. Service no. 267707.
He has a grave or memorial at Zonnebeke, West Flanders, Belgium. His name is remembered on Panel 96 to 98 of the Tyne Cot Memorial Zonnebeke.

In 1917 the Third Battle of Ypres was mounted as an offensive by the Commonwealth Forces to divert German attention from a weakened French front further south. The initial attempt in June to dislodge the Germans from the Messines Ridge was a complete success, but the main assault north-eastward, which began at the end of July, quickly became a dogged struggle against determined opposition and the rapidly deteriorating weather. The campaign finally came to a close in November with the capture of Passchendaele.

1 October 1917

Five powerful German attacks repulsed between Ypres-Menin road and Polygon Wood and at Zonnebeke. Between Chaume Wood and Bezonvaux (Verdun) temporary German success.]

F. J. Bartlett 21 February 1918

Frederick John Bartlett was baptised in Loders Church on 17 October 1897 the son of Frederick John and Adelaide Louisa Bartlett. Frederick John senior was an Innkeeper. In the 1901 census Frederick was aged 3 and living with his parents and 2 brothers and 2 sisters at the Crown Inn.

Military

Frederick Bartlett was a Private in the Somerset Light Infantry. Service no. 28575. He died on 21 February 1918. He is buried at Serancourt British Cemetery, Serancourt-le-Grand, Departement de l’Aisne, Picardie, France Plot VI.I.14. He also has a memorial in Loders, Churchyard.

G. W. J. Read 23 March 1918

George William John ‘Jack’ Read was was born on 4 October 1899 and baptised on 5 November 1899 at Loders Church and was the son of James and Charlotte. His father James was a shepherd. The 1901 census records George Read as living with his parents James and Charlotte and 6 sisters at Yondover.

Military

Jack Read was a Lance Bombardier Royal Garrison Artillery Dorset – Territorial Force (Volunteers) [RGA-(TFV)] No. 334297. He enlisted in Bridport Dorset, sometime between October 1914 and August 1915 making him 16 years old. He should have been 17 years old to be in a Territorial Unit. He was stationed at Nothe Fort Weymouth. It is possible that he went to France with the Dorsetshire Royal Garrison Artillery on 29 January in 1917 aged just 17; he should have been 19 to go abroad.

The Somme Battlefields March – April 1918

Jack Read was a member of the 245th siege battery of guns (6 Howitzers). Their location on the 21 March was the Vallee des Douze near Epehy France. Bombardment by the enemy began at 4.45 am, by 7.40 am when enemy fire slackened off reports began to arrive at headquarters that one battery had a gun knocked out of action. The 245th received orders to withdraw at 2.3Opm one gun abandoned completely smashed by an enemy shell. The Gun was in enemy hands by the 22 March.

Entry of the Diary of Captain Penrose commanding officer of the 245th battery “1918 March 21st = Battle commences at 4.45 am Heavy Phosgene and then H.E. not very close. Gunner Rees and Bdr Hyde wounded in the morning. After lunch go out to clear up tactical situation. By 3pm enemy has guns in Vaucelette Farm and holds Cav. Trench. Lot of enemy planes very low Sorel balloon brought down. While away No2 (1154) destroyed and Blatherwicks foot off. Five others wounded and Bdr Reid killed. Get three guns away by 12 noon, but no teams for the other two so leave them parked and ready and come away with M and rear party in the early morning.”

Jack Read was killed in action in France and Flanders on 21 March 1918 and was awarded the British War medal and the Victory medal posthumously. Jack has no known grave. He still lays where he fell or was given a makeshift grave near Heudecourt by the Germans. Jack’s minor personal effects (those recovered from his pack) were sent home.

The Pozieres Memorial relates to a period of crisis in March and April 1918 when the Allied Fifth Army was driven back by overwhelming numbers across the former Somme battlefields, and the months that followed before the Advance to Victory, which began on 8 August 1918. The Memorial commemorates over 14,000 casualties of the UK and 300 of the South African Forces who have no known grave and who died on the Somme from 21 March to 7 August 1918. The Memorial encloses Pozieres British Cemetery, Plot II of which contains original burials of 1916, 1917 and 1918 carried out by fighting units and field ambulances. There is also a memorial to George Read in Loders Churchyard.

F. Clark 24 April 1918

Frederick Clark was born in 1884. At the time of the 1901 census he was aged 17 and was living with his mother Mary (?) and brothers Arthur 21, Ralph 13 and Leslie 6 at 37 Loders.

In the 1911 census he is aged 27 living at No.16 Loders. He is recorded as the step-son of George and Amelia Brown and working as a farm labourer and living with his brothers Job aged 35 and Leslie aged 16.
On 4 March 1916 Frederick married Mabel Lily Crabb at Loders Church. They were both 32. His father is recorded as Job Clark, deceased, a Plate Layer. When he enlisted he was living with his wife at 16 Crossways, Loders and was working as a general labourer.

Military

Frederick Clark enlisted in Bridport and served as a Private in the Machine Gun Corps (Infantry) 58th Coy. No. 82438. (formerly 25698 Dorset Regiment) He was killed in action on 24 April 1918 in France and Flanders. His memorial is at Panel 90-93 of the Pozieres Memorial.

L. Clark 9 January 1919

A Leslie Albert Clarke was baptised at Loders Church on 9 October 1892. His father was Job and his mother was Amelia. Another baby with the same name and same parents was baptised on 12 May 1895 leading to the presumption that the first baby died in infancy. In the 1901 census Leslie is aged 6 and living with his mother Mary (?) and brothers Arthur (21), Fred (17) and Ralph (13).

In the 1911 census Leslie Clarke is aged 16 and working as a drayman to a corn and seed merchant. He is recorded as the step-son of George and Amelia Brown. Leslie Clark married Harriet Elizabeth Larcombe in the parish of Whitchurch Canonicorum in 1914.

Military

Leslie Clark enlisted when he was 20 and his occupation was given as a carter. Leslie Clark served as a Lance Bombardier 966382 with the Royal Field Artillery 303rd Bde. Service no. 2731. He died on 9 January 1919.
His grave is H.83 Alexandria (Hadra) War Memorial Cemetery, Alexandria, Egypt.

Loders Church Roll of Honour
1914-1918

T. S. Norman Army 1 March 1940

Birth
Tom Samuel Norman was born in 1919. His mother’s maiden name was Meech. Tom attended Loders School from 4 September 1924 to 15 January 1931. In the school records his father’s name is recorded as Frederick Norman and his address 2 Maie Cottages.

Military
Tom Norman was a Private in the Royal Army Ordnance Corps. Service no.7614661. He died on 1 March 1940, age 20. He is buried in Loders Cemetery.

G. W. Holmes Air Force 14 April 1940

Birth
George W C Holmes was born in 1920. His mother’s maiden name was Delacy. George attended Loders School from 15 June 1925 to 17 July 1934. In the school records his father’s name is recorded as George Holmes and his address Uploders.

Military
George William Holmes was an Aircraftsman 1st Class in the RAF. Service no. 631536. He died on war service on 14 April 1940 aged 19. He was stationed at RAF Warmwell and his home address was New Road, Uploders. He is buried in Loders Cemetery.

F. D. Symes Navy 22 November 1943

Birth
Frederick David Symes was born at Uploders on 5th November 1917 at No 1 Box Cottages. His father was Frederick Levi Symes and his mother was Emily Gertrude Travers Symes. His mother’s maiden name was Gale. David went to Loders School from 4 July 1921 to 31 July 1929 and then to Bridport Grammar School. On leaving he worked for Bradfords as an office clerk until joining the Royal Navy on 7th October 1940.

Military
David Symes was a Signalman LT/JX223278 in the Royal Navy Patrol Service. He joined HMS Hebe on 31 August 1941. David was killed on active service on 22 November 1943 aged 26. His name is recorded at Panel 12 Column 1 Lowestoft Naval Memorial. There is a memorial to David Symes in Loders Cemetery.

HMS Hebe

HMS Hebe was a Halcyon Class minesweeper. After a spell of minesweeping between Harwich and Portsmouth the ship joined the Western Approaches Command for convoy escort duty and minesweeping in May 1942. HMS Hebe and two sister ships were sent to North Russia to sweep the mines in the White Sea, being based on Archangle. On return the ship was based in Iceland and sailed as escort to convoy PQ5 to Murmansk on 27 November 1942. On 29 December HMS Hebe was part of escort for PQ4 from Archangle to Iceland. On 5 April 1942 the ship sailed with convoy PQ14 to Murmansk but sustained damage from the ice flow and along with 18 merchant ships (also damaged by ice) had to return to Iceland. On 6 June 1943 HMS Hebe joined convoy WS195 to Gibraltar. On 12 June she sailed with Force X from Gibraltar to Malta and was then based at Malta keeping the entrance to the grand harbour clear of mines and escorting ships through.

HMS Hebe was mine sweeping off Sicily before the July allied landing and from there to the Adriatic keeping the vital port of Bari safe for supply ships to use. At the beginning of November 1943 there were 13 German U-boats in the Mediterranean, and one of them, U.453, made three minelaying sorties off Brindisi and Bari. HMS Hebe became a victim of a mine off Bari on 22 November 1943 and she sank with the loss of 38 of her company including David. The minefield had been laid off Bari harbour by U.453 during the previous week. The explosion was abreast the bulkhead between the boiler rooms on the port side, followed by a second explosion near the same place. She capsized within four minutes of the first explosion.

Memorial to the fallen of the First World War
Loders Church

Article taken from
“The Dorset Year Book 1915-1916”

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